Beyond the Style Box: SMAs and Model Portfolios

This is a summary of a panel discussion from the MMI 2013 Spring Convention held in NYC on April 22-24.

Moderator: Mark Thomas, SVP, Head of Managed Accounts, PIMCO

Panelists:

How have advisor solutions changed over the past few years?

There’s been an overall shift from advisors being individual product practitioners to the Rep as PM (RPM) model, Tipper stated.  This is primarily due to RPM being better at addressing client demands for more flexibility.  As a result of the Financial Crisis, clients now want absolute return on their portfolios, but advisors would serve them better if they focused on providing customized advice solutions and RPM facilitates this, he recommended.

According to Gaskin, advisors have been migrating away from comparing performance of their client’s accounts against a benchmark, to having more  solutions-based conversations.  To support this, he explained, J. P. Morgan manages money in three ways:

  1. Blended benchmark-based portfolios: where they are trying to achieve a similar return with less risk, or a greater return with equal risk;
  2. Risk-based portfolios: which match a given level of risk that the client is comfortable with;
  3. Outcome-based portfolios: which has been generating the most client interest recently, where they’re trying to solve for challenging problems such as finding income, which is difficult in the current low interest rate environment. Continue reading

Why Haven’t Advisors Embraced Unified Managed Accounts?

This is an overview of a session from the MMI 2012 Tech & Ops Conference held in Jersey City, NJ.

Moderator:

  • Jay Link, Managing Director, Managed Solutions Group, Merrill Lynch

Panelists:

  • Andrew Clipper, Managing Director, Head of Wealth Management Services, NA, Citi
  • John Capelli, Managing Director, COO, Managed Account Advisors, Merrill Lynch
  • Rob Klapprodt, President and Co-Founder, Vestmark

Are UMA/UMH and Rep as PM essentially the same thing?

While there are similarities between the Merrill UMA and Rep as PM programs as far as the end investor is concerned there are important differences, Capelli emphasized. UMA’s can include investment management delivered strategies, for example. Also, while Rep as PM can use mutual funds and ETFs to provide exposure to lower correlation asset classes, such as emerging markets, a UMA can deliver them at a lower cost using individual securities, he said.

If the goal is to create a portfolio across all of an investor’s assets, those assets are usually spread out across numerous legal entities and accounts, Clipper observed. The UMA/UMH structure is the best delivery mechanism for a holistic approach. On the OpenWealth platform, they separate out portfolio administration (i.e. rebalancing, asset location, cash management) from the intellectual property (i.e. the models). The portfolio administration is all handled in a central location, while the intellectual property can be added anywhere along the value chain, he said.

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The Wizards of ETFs – Behind the Curtain (2/2)

This is a review of a session from the Money Management Institute’s 2012 Fall Solution Conference.  This is part two of a two-part series.  You can read part one here.

Moderator:

  • Benjamin T. Fulton, Managing Director of Global ETFs, Invesco Powershares Capital Management, LLC

Panelists:

  • Sam Turner, Director of Large Cap Portfolio Management at Riverfront Investment Group
  • Jill Iacono Mavro, Managing Director, Head of National Accounts, State Street Global Advisors – $337 billion in ETF assets globally, 94% in US, SPY launched in 1993
  • Dodd Kittsley, Senior Product Manager & Head of ETP Research, iShares

How much weight should advisors put on liquidity when evaluating an ETF?

There are two levels of liquidity: primary and secondary markets, Mavro said. On the primary market, an ETF is as liquid as the underlying index that it tracks. It depends on how easy is it for authorized market participants to trade the basket of securities that represent the index. On the secondary market, liquidity is defined by how often the ETF is traded. The more it is traded, the thinner the spread between the bid and ask prices. Advisors should look at both levels together, not just one or the other.

Turner disagreed and stated that primary market liquidity and fees are the two worst reasons to select ETFs.  Riverfront focuses primarily on exposure and have never had an issue getting out of an ETF due to lack of primary market liquidity, he said.

Secondary market liquidity can become an issue when investing ETFs according to Michael Jones, also from Riverfront Investments, who was in the audience.  He provided an example where Riverfront was the seed investor for an international ETF that was currency-hedged (The ETF happened to be DBX MSCI EAFE Hedged Equity Fund, symbol: DBEF). Primary market liquidity wasn’t a problem for them since they were working directly with the authorized participant and had great execution.  However the use of the currency hedge became more and more expensive to the point where they had to pull their investment due to the high marginal trading costs of bringing on each additional client, he said.

Should You Avoid ETFs with Low AUM?
An article in Barrons makes the case that low AUM is not a good liquidity indicator for ETFs:
“…asset levels aren’t always the best proxy for liquidity. Unlike a stock, an ETF can still have strong liquidity even if its trading volume is low or its assets are tiny. That’s because the underlying stocks’ or bonds’ liquidity is usually the best way to measure an ETF’s real ease of trading. Barron’s asked market-making firm Knight Capital to rate the liquidity of 30 small ETFs whose 2012 returns are about double those of the S&P 500 as of early November. If you judge ETF tradability by the way its components trade, as Knight does, you’ll find lots of low-asset ETFs with more-than-expected liquidity. “I wouldn’t shy away from ETFs that have low volume or low assets. You just have to be smart about how you trade it,” says Eric Lichtenstein, managing director of Knight’s ETF trading desk.”

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The Wizards of ETFs – Behind the Curtain (1/2)

This is a summary of a session from the Money Management Institute’s 2012 Fall Solution Conference entitled ETFs: To Develop or Not Develop?  This is part one of a two-part series.  You can jump to part two by clicking here.

Moderator:

  • Benjamin T. Fulton, Managing Director of Global ETFs, Invesco Powershares Capital Management, LLC

Panelists:

  • Sam Turner, Director of Large Cap Portfolio Management at Riverfront Investment Group
  • Jill Iacono Mavro, Managing Director, Head of National Accounts, State Street Global Advisors – $337 billion in ETF assets globally, 94% in US, SPY launched in 1993
  • Dodd Kittsley, Senior Product Manager & Head of ETP Research, iShares

How has the trend of advisors shifting towards Rep as Portfolio Manager (RPM) changed your business model?

Turner believes RPM is more of a challenge than a threat since it is the end client experience that matters. Competition from RPM raises the bar, with each crisis causing a shakeout of weaker products and players. The next crisis may not be a market downturn but could be a repeat of 2009 when many government central banks were trying to stimulate their economies through quantitative easing, he said.

Many of the advisors who Turner has spoken to are over-weighted in cash because their client’s are nervous. If the market continues its current upswing into 2013, then this lack of participation could be a risk for these advisors, he warned. Their clients may fire them because they were too cautious.

RPM has also been a huge growth engine outside the US, Kittsley stated. Financial transparency rules enacted in the UK will be a huge catalyst for growth in that market. ETFs are well-suited for managed books of business.

StateStreet’s distribution efforts started in the RIA segment, Mavro explained. They treat it more like an institutional service model. iShares and PowerShares have been focusing on RPM for many years and it has become a differentiator for them on larger platforms Regulatory reform targeting advisors running discretionary portfolios often result in more outsourcing, which benefits firms like Riverfront, she claimed.

Related WM Today Posts
Has Rep as PM Growth Peaked?
Rep as PM: The Inside Scoop

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Has Rep as PM Growth Peaked? (2/2)

This is a summary of a panel discussion from the Money Management Institute’s 2012 Spring conference held in Chicago, IL.  This is part 2 of 2.  You can read Part 1 here.

Moderator: Jay Link, Managing Director, Merrill Lynch

Panelists:
Lorna Sabia, Managing Director, Head of Managed Solutions Group, Merrill Lynch
James Walker, Head of Consulting Group, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney
Matthew Witkos, President, Eaton Vance Distributors.  Chairman of MMI.

Is your firm coming out with any new product offerings?

According to Witkos, Eaton Vance has developed a new product that they are calling Exchange Traded Managed Funds.  It is like an ETF since it trades like a stock, except without the transparency of an ETF so that the money manager’s intellectual property is protected.

What is the sponsor perspective on mutual fund velocity?  

No one wants advisors over-trading mutual funds, Walker commented.  Firms look at trade velocity and try to keep it within a certain range, he said.  The industry should be more aware of the difference between selling mutual funds individually versus fitting them into a larger portfolio.  Walker thinks that market velocity won’t be going away any time soon.
Sabia feels that velocity is a complex topic and more data is needed to determine the impact that it might have on a portfolio.  She also stated that she believes that sponsors, advisors and managers all “own” the issue of velocity and everyone should work together to deal with it.

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Has Rep as PM Growth Peaked? (1/2)

This is a summary of a panel discussion from the Money Management Institute’s 2012 Spring conference held in Chicago, IL.  This is part 1 of 2.  You can read part 2 of 2 here.

Moderator: Jay Link, Managing Director, Merrill Lynch

Panelists:
Lorna Sabbia, Managing Director, Head of Managed Solutions Group, Merrill Lynch
James Walker, Head of Consulting Group, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney
Matthew Witkos, President, Eaton Vance Distributors.  Chairman of MMI.
Has the growth of RPM programs peaked?  According to Dover Research, five years ago, there was $1.2 trillion of client assets in managed solutions and RPM/RAA combined were less than 30% of that total.  Today, total managed assets have grown to $2.4 trillion while rep-driven programs have increased their share to 40% or almost $1 trillion.

How important is RPM to your firm?

RPM is Morgan Stanley’s fastest growing program, Walker reported, with $560 bil in all advisory programs, $150 bil in RPM globally.  Major change in past few year has been change from individual equities (now 34%) to include ETFs, mutual funds, etc.  This is a great solution for Reps that consider themselves to be active allocators.  Trend: move towards discretion, driven by FAs practice management, customers want outcome based investing.  From a regulatory sense, it’s easier to deliver on fiduciary duty.
Sabbia joined the Managed Solutions Group seven months ago.  At Merrill, RPM is called the Personal Investment Advisory (PIA) program and was launched in 1996, now $105 bil AUM.  Approximately 4,500 FAs leverage the program and they’re segmented into three buckets: it’s their fastest growing segment with a $15.7 bil net increase last year and they’re on track to beat that number this year, she said.

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Diversify, Diversify, Diversify – 3 Ways to Help Advisory Products Succeed in Volatile Markets

“How can clients improve diversification in their portfolios?” was the question Roger Paradiso posed to those attending this session at the MMI Tech and Ops Conference 2011.  Client’s portfolios aren’t performing as expected and their needs aren’t being met, he said, they are looking for solutions. The recent rise in volatility in the market, he explained, combined with the correlation of many previously uncorrelated asset classes, has increased the priority of diversification for many investors.

Moderator:

Roger Paradiso, President and Chief Investment Officer, Private Portfolio Group, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

Panelists:

Mark Thomas, Senior VP, Head of Managed Accounts, PIMCO
Joe Mrak, CEO, FolioDynamix
Donna Davis, Director of Trade Management, Private Portfolio Group, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

Alternative investments help to diversify portfolios. How are you introducing alternatives into advisory solutions?

PIMCO uses a forward-looking process when designing client solutions, Mark explained. They evaluate what vehicle, product or platform makes sense and decide on the right structure for each client. Support for 40Act funds, limited partnerships, private funds, and separate accounts are all included in their program.

One issue when introducing new products is ensuring that there is enough capacity, Mark said. PIMCO is continually looking for ways to lower the minimums in their alternative structures and vehicles to make them available to a wider audience.

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